The True Test of Integrity – Can the Citizen Vigilante Survive?

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left in suspense

The fight against corruption is becoming too difficult in Ghana. Most opposition parties have won elections on the promise of fighting corruption when elected into office. I strongly believe if any party were to come to the office and spent all its energy to fight corruption, it’ll be the single most plausible achievement. This is because, corruption has proven undoubtedly, to be the major drawback for Ghana’s development.

 

 

Do the parties who accuse incumbent governments of corruption, really fight corruption when elected? Professor Atta Mills accused NPP of corruption and promised to fight corruption when given the mandate. Right under his nose, Woyome swept a cool GhC52,000,000 for no work done. What would later be called ‘woyomegate’, was planned, engineered, and executed by senior officials of his government giving Justice Dotse a cause to make the famous statement; “create, loot, and share, as if an enterprise has been created for it”.

 

 

Did Prof Mills reprimand his officers? No! He instead, chased after Dr Wireku Brobbey, a former appointee under the NPP administration, in order to prove his ‘resoluteness’ to ‘fight’ corruption, a mission that will later be a botched one. It’s rumoured that, then attorney general, now Ghana’s special prosecutor, lost his job because he tried to correct the corruption pathways that were emerging at the time – a rumour which NDC operatives forcefully denied and rather accused Amidu of harbouring hatred for President Mills for passing him in favour of Mahama for running mate. The NDC undoubtedly suffered from the inky pen of Mr Martin Amidu who wrote an avalanche of articles to expose corruption in the NDC. Without the doubt, I’d say Amidu rose into fame and gained a huge statue in the eyes of the public as an anti-corruption crusader earning him the fond name, citizen vigilante because of his fearless fight against corruption in NDC.

 

 

Under President Mahama, a countless number of corruption cases riddled his government. Infamous Brazil scandal is just one example to illustrate the legendary corruption in that administration. To the amazement of Ghanaians, irredeemably corrupt Nyantakyi was indicted by a commission of inquiry set up by H.E. President Mahama but the report only gathered dust as Nyantakyi walked majestically off the hook. Another politically fatal decision was to shift Afriyie Ankrah, the fulcrum around which the Brazil saga revolved, to the presidency as a staffer. This sent a loud signal that Mahama was either unwilling or incapable (or both) of fighting corruption. Mr Amidu, left no stone unturned, to the admiration of most citizens including myself, in whipping the damn ass of the Mahama-led government. “May God never give us a looter like Mahama again” is just one of the many hard lines that flowed from his pen against Mahama.

 

 

President Akufo-Addo won massively in the 2016 elections largely because he branded himself as an incorruptible man who will not countenance corruption on any day. I personally had firm faith in him. My hope swelled when he appointed Martin Amidu as the SP. Sadly, my trust in him in the fight against corruption has deflated to less than one quarter as many scandals under his administration have been badly handled. He’s gradually proving to be worse than Mahama. President Akufo-Addo is trying to prove his ‘incorruptibility’ through the easiest route, by going after previous appointees who dabbled in corruption in the past.

 

From the narrative, fighting corruption at your own has been almost impossible for all presidents. Worst still, under President Nana Addo, there seems to be an emerging trend of attacking people who dare speak against corruption in his administration. History will have it that, an anti-corruption crusader, Ahmed Hussein-Suale was killed under President Nana Addo when according to Kennedy Agyapong, government conspired to wage war on one of the finest undercover journalists in the world, Anas Aremeyaw Anas.

Does the appointment of Amidu really mean Nana Addo is willing to deviate from the hypocritic paradox of fighting corruption while focusing on former appointees? Can he set precedence by prosecuting corrupt members of his own government? Or is Nana Addo playing smart by putting the ball squarely in the court of Martin Amidu? Will Amidu honestly discharge this mandate or take the blame of being unable to prosecute members of the ruling government?

 

The last question above becomes tougher as Mr Bissiw, who was recently caught pants down by Anas and his Tiger Eye on tape bending processes put in place to stem galamsey is before Amidu. Before I proceed any further, it’s puzzling how Mr Bissiw all of a sudden has developed an amorous relationship with the CID, an institution that since its inception, has never made any adverse findings against any top government official. The CID is a just poodle in the hands of the ruling class. Ghanaians have lost every hope in that institution’s ability to do any good job as far as fighting political corruption is concerned. It’s become a forum for whitewashing politicians. I advise Mr Bissiw to stop engaging in self-adulation for merely appearing before the CID and rather look at a serious institution that has public trust in order to clear his name if he believes he’s innocent.

 

After the galamsey fraud exposē, Anas petitioned the OSP headed by one of the fiercest adversaries of Anas Aremeyaw Anas. This is where I depart with Anas. Is Anas serious to get to the bottom of this matter or he’s only interested in the publicity of the exposē and nothing more? Because for me, I believe his sour relationship with Amidu in the past, can cause him to tamper with the investigation in order to prove his previous criticisms against Anas. Or maybe Amidu (and I hope so) would let professionalism take precedence over personal sentiments. What gives me hope is the strategic circumvention of the OSP by Mr Bissiw and his assigns. It appears Mr Bissiw fears that office. Even though it’s on record that the OSP has commenced investigations, Mr Bissiw and his assigns have resorted to a deliberate ploy to blackout the OSP in the whole discussion about the investigation into the galamsey fraud exposē and rather sought to elevate the CID where he finds a convenient escape route. It’s dangerous to allow a thief to decide where he should be tried. In this case, Mr Bissiw who’s a subject of investigation, cannot make preference for where he should be investigated as he’s seen doing.

 

This is the real test, Mr Amidu. I want to continue to stick my neck out for you. I have so much reverence for you and your principles. I’ve learned and continue to learn a great deal from you. Please don’t let me down. I want to give you a hint. A bird has whispered to me that since Mr Bissiw and his assigns have failed to get Anas fall for their CID ploy, they’ll be coming to your feet in order to negotiate their way out. When they come, please sack them. One argument they have raised in their circles is that, if Anas will not unmask, then it should be a basis for you to dismiss the case before you. Please, when they tell you this, tell them, the evidence doesn’t include the face of Anas. I don’t know which rule of evidence admissibility makes unmasking a requirement. Kindly don’t allow these self-preservation politicians to use you as they did with Kennedy Agyapong to shortchange this country.

As you said in your vetting, and I believe so, you’ll not be used by any politician to do political prosecution. Similarly, don’t allow them to use you for political shielding. The OSP has come at a time many Ghanaians have lost hope in the CIDs, EOCOs, etc and so history will inscribe your name in gold if you bequeath to us a credible anticorruption office. A credible anticorruption office means an impartial office that is prepared to deal with all persons regardless of status, tribe, religion, gender, etc who wickedly plunder our poor country’s (which is bereft of good roads, hospitals, potable drinking water, and other basic amenities) meagre resources. In the Singapore (a country with 0% corruption) example, corruption was fought, dealing with those at the top and not those at the bottom as dealing with those at the top, sends a very strong signal of the consequences of being corrupt.

We shall all watch closely as you confront this daunting task of dealing with officialdom. I have had so many heart attacks from people I trusted would do good to this country and I just pray you won’t make it onto that list of heartbreakers. Your integrity is on the chopping board, please redeem it.

Thank you, sir and kind regards!

Frederick Kweku Osei

Accra – Ghana

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